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Artist. Mathematician. Philosopher. Follow me on instagram.com/shreemoyee_art

Man is nothing else but what he makes of himself. Such is the first principle of existentialism — Jean Paul Sartre

Existentialism became one of the most influential intellectual movements in 19th and 20th century Europe. At its core it emphasizes an individual is free and responsible for his own existence through acts of his own will.

Does the internet really need one more article? (a.k.a the context)

That is a very valid concern. Allow me to build up to the answer by asking,

What is the true purpose of our lives?

There is so much noise growing up, from the society and an education system both of which are rather unfairly biased by religion. In certain settings, we…


Click here to read part 1 and gain more context!

In the second and final part, I try to discuss some of the most influential ideas of existentialism, that hold relevance in the modern day.

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Jean Paul Sartre and Simon de-beauvoir

Never live in bad faith

We live in bad faith (or mauvaise foi as Sartre calls it) when we convince ourselves that things have to be a certain way and shut our eyes to other possibilities. For example when we tell ourselves that we have to do a particular job, or have to live with a particular person or live in a given city.

The most well known example of…


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Albert Camus

Man is nothing else but what he makes of himself. Such is the first principle of existentialism — Jean Paul Sartre

Existentialism became one of the most influential intellectual movements in 19th and 20th century Europe. At its core it emphasizes an individual is free and responsible for his own existence through acts of his own will.

Lets begin with a brief history lesson!

19th century

Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard is often considered the first existentialist philosopher. He proposed that each individual, and not the society or religion, is responsible for conveying meaning to his life and living it passionately or “authentically”. German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche talked about the…


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Photo by Mel Poole on Unsplash

I became insane, with long stretches of horrible sanity. — Edgar Allan Poe

What is so special about Edgar Allan Poe — that his stories are so frighteningly tragic and disturbingly macabre or that they mirror his own tragic life (he was the quintessential tortured artist), or that he redefined the genre of horror stories?

You be the judge!

The psychology of guilt and madness

While themes of death, madness and goth run amok in Poe’s famous stories — “the black cat” and “the tell tale heart”, what is central to both is the guilt of the narrators as they commit meticulously explained murders, the guilt…


Here’s a (rather useless) trivia — the reason I study mathematics is because sometimes the remarkability of results that are “arrived” at, are just utterly astonishing. While most of the times they are intuitive, sometimes, the results are beyond what most people shall call “common-sense.” Probability is one such field — you would expect something, but the actual expectation would be completely different (pun intended)! In this article I shall elaborate upon one of the famous puzzles in mathematics — the birthday paradox and some of it’s variations.

So, let’s dive in!

The birthday paradox

What is the least number of people needed…


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Photo by JR Korpa on Unsplash

When I met Auguste, I was young and vulnerable, I had not seen much of the world, I was oblivious to the sensation and power of love. Oh, how foolish was I! I was an artist, but never in any work of art had I found the kind of beauty that I saw in him, even his platitudes were flushed with the kind of exhilaration I had never experienced before. I was in a foreign land, I was alone, or rather lost, and in him I found the familiarity and comfort, I always craved.

I can not remember precisely when…


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“The only way to deal with an unfree world is to become so absolutely free that your very existence is an act of rebellion.” — Albert Camus

Having been quarantined for a month now (owing to the pandemic caused by the virus, about which I hereby pledge to not mention throughout the course of this article), I found myself incessantly pondering about the meaning and the purpose of life — I had several plans for this year, and they were interrupted by the universe, rather royally.

So, when I read Albert Camus’ essay “the myth of Sisyphus”, a warm realization…


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Photo by Taylor Ann Wright on Unsplash

I was acquainted with the genre of gothic fiction with Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre back in one of the summers of my high-school (I am a little hazy on the exact year). The haunting blend of horror, death and romance promptly drew me in and since then gothic literature made frequent appearances in my reading list. So when I spotted the copy of the only novel written by Oscar Wilde, I knew “The picture of Dorian Gray” was going to be my companion for the next couple of late nights and lazy mornings.

To be completely honest, the ending of…


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Photo by sanjoy saha on Unsplash

25th January, 8:00 pm

Roy sat at his steering wheel transfixed with fear and horror. His brain was registering the horrific scene that had just unfolded in front of his eyes. At one instant he was driving in his car, anxious about the date he had been looking forward to, going over ice-breakers in his head, in the next a silhouette appeared in front of his car without any warning. In a frenzy, he tried to hit the breaks, but all he saw was the body hitting the hood of his car and falling on the streets with a thud, splattering blood on his…


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Photo by Meaghan Cafferty on Unsplash

The other day while strolling in the deserted lanes of my locality, my devoted ruminations: far removed from the life as I know it, were abruptly broken by a black cat haphazardly crossing in front of me. Irritated at being forced to confront reality, with the added burden of making an onerous decision, I stood there cursing its feline intelligence and my inopportune positioning. …

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